Read Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are by Seth Stephens-Davidowitz Online

Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are

Blending the informed analysis of The Signal and the Noise with the instructive iconoclasm of Think Like a Freak, a fascinating, illuminating, and witty look at what the vast amounts of information now instantly available to us reveals about ourselves and our worldprovided we ask the right questions.By the end of an average day in the early twenty-first century, human beings searching the internet will amass eight trillion gigabytes of data. This staggering amount of informationunprecedented in historycan tell us a great deal about who we arethe fears, desires, and behaviors that drive us, and the conscious and unconscious decisions we make. From the profound to the mundane, we can gain astonishing knowledge about the human psyche that less than twenty years ago, seemed unfathomable.Everybody Lies offers fascinating, surprising, and sometimes laugh-out-loud insights into everything from economics to ethics to sports to race to sex, gender and more, all drawn from the world of big data. What percentage of white voters didnt vote for Barack Obama because hes black? Does where you go to school affect how successful you are in life? Do parents secretly favor boy children over girls? Do violent films affect the crime rate? Can you beat the stock market? How regularly do we lie about our sex lives and whos more self-conscious about sex, men or women?Investigating these questions and a host of others, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz offers revelations that can help us understand ourselves and our lives better. Drawing on studies and experiments on how we really live and think, he demonstrates in fascinating and often funny ways the extent to which all the world is indeed a lab. With conclusions ranging from strange-but-true to thought-provoking to disturbing, he explores the power of this digital truth serum and its deeper potentialrevealing biases deeply embedded within us, information we can use to change our culture, and the questions were afraid to ask that might be essential to our healthboth emotional and physical. All of us are touched by big data everyday, and its influence is multiplying. Everybody Lies challenges us to think differently about how we see it and the world....

Title : Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are
Author :
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ISBN : 9780062390851
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 338 pages
Url Type : Home » Everybody » Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are

Everybody Lies Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Everybody Lies Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are Seth Stephens Davidowitz on FREE shipping on Everybody Lies Big Data, New Data and What the Internet Everybody Lies Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are Audible Audio Edition Seth Stephens Davidowitz, Tim Everybody Lies Seth Stephens Davidowitz Hardcover Everybody Lies Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are by Seth Stephens Davidowitz On Sale Seth Stephens Davidowitz Seth Stephens Davidowitz has used data from the internet particularly Google searches to get new insights into the human psyche. Truth and statistics How to find out what people really Everybody Lies Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are By Seth Stephens Davidowitz. Latest Topics ZDNet Hortonworks Data Platform turns . new cloud partnerships announced HDP hits magic v milestone, gets containers and new OLAP y version of Hive. Security ZDNet Elon Musk emails Tesla workers We ve been extensively sabotaged by employee Tesla employee leaks sensitive Tesla data to third parties and tried to Dan s Data letters Dan s Data letters Publication date May Last modified Dec Breaking the law for fun and profit I read that house electric meters work by Diacritic Wikipedia Diacritics in Latin Greek accent acute double acute grave double grave circumflex caron, h ek breve inverted breve Christopher Bollyn Alex Jones and Disinfo April , Alex Jones recent interview with Steve Pieczenik is a good example of how Jones misleads the public about who is really

Everybody Lies: Big Data, New Data, and What the Internet Can Tell Us About Who We Really Are Reviews

  • Caroline

    I wish I could give this book more than five stars. Anyone who has a sneaking feeling that Americans aren't who they SAY they are will find confirmation here. It's also easy to read, no academic language here.

    I was already riveted by the introduction. His premise is that we all lie to each other, pollsters, and ourselves, but not to that white box where you type internet searches. Both before and after the election everyone went nuts trying to figure out why Trump was doing so much better than p
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  • aPriL does feral sometimes

    I was annoyed by the author’s writing style in ‘Everybody Lies’. I have no doubts author Seth Stephens-Davidowitz was trying to write to a large general audience, including that assumed class of American non-science reader who hates math and binge watches ‘Keeping Up with the Kardashians’. Good for him, and maybe you, right? But I became more and more annoyed as I read. Ah, well. It is an interesting and informative read, in spite of trying too hard to be fun, imho.

    What is the book about? I am g
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  • linhtalinhtinh

    A pretty short book with some interesting remarks, but not yet charming enough for me. The author definitely has his quirky and funny moments, when he presents himself, his family, and especially his views more. Yet the books' ideas and findings aren't exactly ground breaking. The types of questions like this have been posed in Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. The usefullness of big data has been discussed by ones such as Dataclysm: Who We Are (discussion o ...more

  • Lolly K Dandeneau

    via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/

    “In 2014, there were about 6,000 searches for the exact phrase “how to kill your girlfriend” and 400 murders of girlfriends.”

    As a chapter tells us, ALL THE WORLD’S A LAB. The data collected and shared by Seth Stephens- Davidowitz is downright disturbing at times. That there are dark sexual proclivities isn’t shocking so much as what they are, based on research. Also, who knew that your neighbor winning the lottery can have a strange impact on y
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  • David

    This is an engaging book about how big data can be used to improve our understanding of human behavior, thinking, emotions, and preference. The basic idea is that if you ask people about their behavior or their preferences in surveys, even anonymous surveys, they will often lie. People do not like to admit to low-brow preferences; racists do not want to admit to their prejudices, most people who watch pornography do not want to admit to it, and even voting is often misrepresented; some people wh ...more

  • Matt Ward

    This book could have used a good editor. It tries to be a Gladwell-type of book without fully succeeding. Issue 1 is that the anecdotal stories are not fleshed out enough to really draw you in like Gladwell does. This causes much of the book to come across as a list of facts, and it gets pretty old by the midway point.

    The other issue is a growing trend among people writing data books. They want to write in a colloquial style to make it seem informal and easy to read. They don't want to scare off
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  • Ahmed Hussein Shaheen

    A great book, I enjoyed every word of it. It is amazing how much we can learn about sex, penis size, homosexuality, racism, and many other interesting topics by just looking at the searches made by the people. I can’t wait to read his next book, tentatively titled Everybody (Still) Lies.

    "More than 40 percent of complaints about a partner’s penis size say that it’s too big."

  • Amos

    No practicing analyst or social scientist will find anything of value in this book. It verges on being dangerously deceptive, filled with logical fallacies and half baked reasoning for it's conclusions. The book claims to be finding truth in an uncertain world, but actually is just adding to the noise.